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         Abstract
 
Implications of Population Aging with Special Focus on Social Protection for Elderly Persons in South Asia
S. Irudaya Rajan
The aging of populations is one of the glaring consequences of demographic transition. The developed countries of the world have already begun to experience its consequences and have developed policies and programmes to avert any crisis that could result from this situation, and to promote economic growth. However, developing economies such as those of South Asia are also well on their way along a similar course, and are prepared to either face the consequences or to manage the growing numbers of the elderly through appropriate policies. Within this background, the article assesses the current existing social pension programmes for the elderly population in South Asia, drawing on the experiences of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. It also summarizes the various social security measures available in South Asia for public employees, private sector workers, and the poor in general, for contingencies such as medical care, pensions, survivor benefit, invalidity benefit and old-age benefit. Among other things, this article examines the National Old Age Pension (NOAP) scheme in India and Universal Allowance for Senior Citizens (UASC) in Nepal. The aging of populations is one of the glaring consequences of demographic transition. The developed countries of the world have already begun to experience its consequences and have developed policies and programmes to avert any crisis that could result from this situation, and to promote economic growth. However, developing economies such as those of South Asia are also well on their way along a similar course, and are prepared to either face the consequences or to manage the growing numbers of the elderly through appropriate policies. Within this background, the article assesses the current existing social pension programmes for the elderly population in South Asia, drawing on the experiences of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. It also summarizes the various social security measures available in South Asia for public employees, private sector workers, and the poor in general, for contingencies such as medical care, pensions, survivor benefit, invalidity benefit and old-age benefit. Among other things, this article examines the National Old Age Pension (NOAP) scheme in India and Universal Allowance for Senior Citizens (UASC) in Nepal.


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